Social Networking Blog

Guy Clapperton on the evolving new media

Twitter annoyances

Image representing Twitter as depicted in Crun...
Image via CrunchBase

Great blog post pointed out by Jack Schofield of the Guardian to his followers, on ways of annoying Twitter users. I could add a few; we’re getting to the stage at which posting to Twitter about Twitter is going to seem very old hat (we could just accept Twitter’s there and get on with it, nobody phones you to talk about the phone network); engaging in endless one to one communications which should long ago have been taken to private mail and posting exclusively about your product are among them. But the list in this link is pretty much excellent and I’m relieved to say I don’t indulge in many of them. Not often anyway…

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April 16, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Social media experts 2

Earlier today I blogged about social media experts and how half of them don’t know what they’re talking about. It’s all too new, nobody’s an expert yet.

Another post has been drawn to my attention on Twitter by Nikki Pilkington, for which my thanks – have a look at this item on how you know when you’re talking to a social media expert – and be prepared to cringe at how many of these habits you’ve adopted yourself!

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April 3, 2009 Posted by | social media trends | , , , , | Leave a comment

Social networking ‘experts’ and ‘gurus’

Digitage Web 2.0
Image by ocean.flynn via Flickr

Someone asked what I thought was an odd question when I started this blog a month or so ago. “So, you’re going to become a social networking guru then,” they said.

Once I’d picked myself up off the floor I asked them why they thought so. “Well, the socialnetworkingblog.co.uk domain name, the book coming out…” I could see how it was looking. But I’m not. In fact I hate people who describe themselves as ‘gurus’ or ‘experts’ in such new areas – I don’t actually believe they exist yet, we don’t know how social networking will evolve over time because it hasn’t had enough just yet. I was delighted. therefore, to be shown this piece on people styling themselves as such describing them as idiots.

It did make me think a bit about my objectives for the blog. First, this blog exists as a statement: I’ve been commissioned to write a book on social networking and I’d look ridiculous if I didn’t walk the walk and other such cliches. It’s a good repository of links I might come across that will help me, and if I can share some of the insights I gain with other people along the way, fair enough. When I found the socialnetworkingblog.co.uk domain name was available I couldn’t resist it, which is pure vanity, but if I have a book in the area coming out it might yet be useful for marketing.

And I do a bit of speaking in the area, it’s true – I enjoy that part of my work (actually I enjoy most of my work except the filing and record keeping, but nothing’s perfect). And if the blog brings a bit more of that work through, great. Sharing your research is a new way of working for me, but I’m finding it highly pleasurable.

None of which makes me anything like a guru. A guru knows stuff. A guru offers guidance, vision and direction. When the book comes out it’s going to be a lot more about practicality than the vision thing, and accommodating social networking into a business plan. Simple brass tacky stuff is what I want to offer, nothing high-flown. And there are so many people who claim they’re some sort of social networking know-it-all! Frankly even if I did know everything about social networking I wouldn’t call myself a guru, it would put me in the same league as so many chancers!

I was talking to a colleague – who I met through social media of course – about this only today. She thought of a new term I could use. I don’t have to be a guru, I don’t have to claim to be an expert somehow, I just have to use this new term and it’ll work fine. I think I’m going to do it. As of right now.

That’s it, then. I am the social networking antiguru. End of!

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April 3, 2009 Posted by | Unexpected things happen | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Social Networking makes you more productive

Facebook, Inc.
Image via Wikipedia

I’ve had a feeling about this for some time. And now there’s actual evidence to suggest social networking makes you more productive. Visiting Twitter, Facebook, YouTube et al actually makes you a better worker.

Some of us have been saying this sort of thing for years. As long ago as the mid-nineties, when I signed up to something called Cix (still going, a very early social networking thing before the term was invented) once I’d gone freelance I noticed that if I had some human contact, albeit through a keyboard,  I was happier, more motivated and therefore more productive.

This is exactly what services like Twitter offer, particularly to the self-employed or remote working community. I’ve been stunned – often – to read about people banning their staff from its use, missing the point that having pointless conversations about last night’s telly is part of the process, not something that distracts from it.

And now it’s official. There’s evidence. I’m not surprised in the slightest.

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April 2, 2009 Posted by | social media trends | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sun taken in by blogger

…but why? There’s an item on the Sun newspaper’s website today (and here’s a commentator blogging about it just to show how quickly these things spread) about how Google Street View caught someone being unfaithful to his wife. She recognised the car outside someone’s house when the husband in question said he was away on business.

And guess what – this blogger now claims it was him all the time, scamming the Sun and persuading them it was a genuine news item when it wasn’t.

Well, well done. Quite. But…why bother? I can see the fun element of it a bit I suppose, and as a jobbing journalist it’s good that we’re all being reminded of the imperative of checking our stories. But how this one could have been checked I don’t know; but yes, false stories should be uncovered.

But why bother placing it in the first place? I’m a little stumped at this one. Personal glory? Maybe. A laugh? Well, yes, but where do you take it from there? He says there will be more like this on the way, be still my beating heart. Maybe he’s trying to persuade us all to be a bit more cynical and critical about the stories that appear in the UK tabloid press. Funnily enough I don’t think we needed telling about that.

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March 31, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | 11 Comments